March Spark Session: Wiki How?

Jonathan Haines and Nicole Williams talk through five considerations as you transition from “I don’t like my Wikipedia page” to becoming a Wiki wonk – because working Wikipedia wrong can land you in world of wasted time!

Read more

February Spark Session: Ask The Experts – Incorporating Media Into Your Messaging

Barb Ford, Sean Malone, and Nicole Williams answer all your questions about incorporating media into your organization’s messaging.

November Spark Session: Improve Your Digital Marketing

Our November Spark Session “Improve Your Digital Marketing” explored meaningful metrics, focusing your message, and tying up loose ends.

Show Notes

Intro 1:20

Most Important Aspects of a Digital Strategy 3:13

Customer Journey 4:58

Web Design Concepts 6:11

What to Communicate for Success 11:25

Organic Synergy 12:50

Meaningful Measurements 15:30

Digital Strategy 17:21

Cohesive Messaging 20:15

What’s Coming Next 22:05

Summary 22:40

Q&A

Digital Marketing Tools 27:02

Becoming the Best 29:43

Marketing Targets 32:11

General vs. Specific 34:35

Resources

www.DiscoverPraxis.com
www.DerekMagill.com

September Spark Session: Telling vs Selling

The September Spark Session, “Telling vs Selling,” explored how to listen intently so you “sell” the right aspect of your product. Be sure to watch the whole recording!

Show notes

Figure out which story to tell (4:50)

Who does your story target? (6:15)

How to sell a cellphone (7:30)

The 3 principles of ALL selling: Ask, Listen, Link (9:30)

Telling or Selling #1: GOP.com vs Democrats.org vs LP.org (11:00)

Telling or Selling #2: Organ donation (14:15)

Sell a complex policy in bite-size chunks (18:05)

Making Fiscal Federalism (somewhat) sexy (18:40)

Why people buy (24:45)

When should you tell? (27:45)

Make numbers memorable – even emotional (30:20)

Selling to policy wonks (32:00)

Q & A:

How can a policy paper sell, not tell? (34:15)

Should my selling points always be positive? (36:35)

What policy area has been the most difficult to sell? (38:55)

What if I just can’t figure out my listener’s desire? (41:10)

When you don’t yet know your audience – say, as you develop a policy – how can you sell? What if you can’t afford market research? (45:00)

Resources

Roger Dooley, Brainfluence

 

Save the date! Our next Spark Session is November 17.

To catch up on past Spark Sessions, visit our Archives.

August Spark Session: Ask the Experts

In our August Spark Session, Scott Graves (LibertyLab), Kevan Kjar (ArrowHead3 Consulting), and Spark Freedom’s own Nicole Williams tackled a whole sombrero full of your questions about marketing and communications. This session is so chock full of information, be sure to watch the whole recording or download the audio for your listening pleasure!

Here’s this session’s roadmap:

What do I do if I can’t find stories to support our marketing or policy message? (2:45)

How do I even get started with our 2017 marketing plan? (5:45)

Recently, our Facebook page views have dropped dramatically. What strategies work now? Should we move to a different platform? (7:35)

How can we persuade people we know are opposed to our policy proposal? (14:20)

How do I tackle objections? (19:15)

What social media platforms should we be on, and how often should we post? (24:50)

What is the appropriate length for a YouTube video for a policy idea/message? (29:50)

We’re thinking of doing a podcast. Do you think podcasts are still a good marketing tool? What tips do you have to make them successful (e.g. length, frequency, content)? (34:00)

Do you think social media is more important than your website? (39:05)

How can you effectively market on a very small/no dollar budget? Do you have good examples of that you can share? (41:05)

Any advice for making videos on a dime? (46:15)

 

Download the audio (right-click > save): Spark Session August 2016 – Audio

 

Our next Spark Session is September 22. Save the date!

To catch up on past Spark Sessions, visit the Archives.

 

 

July Spark Session: The DNA of Story

This month’s Spark Session centered on the DNA of storytelling. Spark Freedom’s Nicole Williams and Kevan Kjar of Arrowhead3 Consulting discussed what it takes to create winning stories that further your policy or organizational message.

Great stories, stories that people are moved by and become invested in, consists of three parts:

  1. Mission: What problem are you trying to solve? What issue is your policy addressing?
  2. Hero: Who are you solving it for? This should be someone with a real story to whom people can relate.
  3. Conflict: What stands in your Hero’s way? What obstacle(s) need to be overcome?

Once you’ve established these three components and crafted your story, how do you get people to listen to it? To capture your audience’s attention, you’ll need a great log line. A log line is a one-sentence summary of what your story is about using the three key elements in your story, i.e. the central conflict, the hero, and the mission. A log line should have an emotional “hook” that stimulates the audience’s interest. Be sure to watch the recording for examples.

Of course, you can’t create compelling stories and log lines that appeal to everybody, so you’ll want to focus on your strongest audience. And, while not all people in your audience are going through what your hero is going through, your log line should elicit a strong sense of empathy from them for your hero. This will get them invested in your message.

Finally, don’t stop with one good story. If one person is facing a certain issue that your policy is trying address, there is a good chance that other people are, too. The more stories you can tell of people dealing with the problem you’re trying to solve, the more compelling your narrative becomes.

Watch the entire Spark Session to learn more, such as:

  • How to appeal to different audiences
  • How to humanize your story
  • How to get people to care about your policy
  • How to write a successful log line (and what a log line is)
  • Examples are also provided for reference!

You can also download the slide deck from the session: The DNA of Story.

 

 

June Spark Session – Ask the Experts!

For our June Spark Session, we tackled another round of your marketing questions. We covered the basic rules of successful coalition building, the do’s and don’ts of email marketing, and how to manage your organization’s reputation on Wikipedia.

Spark Freedom’s Jonathan Haines started off the session by discussing how to build strong coalitions. Your most fundamental task is to get a diverse group of people to set their individual goals aside in favor of working toward a common goal. You need to create a strong message that transcends differences in viewpoints among your coalition partners and generates full buy-in from them. Once you have that message you can then devise a joint strategy to achieve your coalition’s goal.

Next up, Sarah Johnson from Spotlight Liberty had some great tips for making your email marketing efforts more successful. There are several factors you need to consider when trying to get the most out of your email list. One key piece of advice Sarah mentioned was to scrub your list every 6 months so that you’re only keeping your most relevant and interested users. She also provided a few great email marketing resources. Check them out:

What’s a good email open rate & click rate? [Benchmark data]

How to get your sales emails opened

Email opens trends on mobile devices in 2015

Lastly, Spark Freedom’s Nicole Williams gave some great tips for tackling “vandalism” to your Wikipedia page committed by your opponents. When you discover inaccuracies, you may be tempted to correct them all at once. However, Nicole recommended to address them in small chunks and over time to avoid a “wiki war.” Make sure you learn and abide by the Wikipedia’s community standards and editing guidelines. And when you make your edits, use credible third-party sources instead of your own website.

Watch the entire webinar to find out:

  • The process for creating a coalition from the ground up
  • How often you should send out mass emails
  • What email marketing metrics you really need to measure
  • Essential tips for staying out of “wiki wars”

[Webinar] April Spark Session: Ask the Experts!

app

For our April Expert Q & A Spark Session, we asked you to send us your questions about anything marketing and communications. Our experts who responded included Kevan Kjar from Arrowhead 3 Consulting, Sarah Johnson from Spotlight Liberty, and Corey Burns from eResources. (Learn more about them and other members of our experts council here.) Here are some highlights from the session.

Kevan Kjar responded to a question about how to engage someone who does not already agree with your policy. The best way to convince such a person is to tell a strong and meaningful story, one that is emotional to the buyer, differentiated from the competition, and stars a credible real-life hero.

Sarah Johnson shared advice with us on how to make your trade show booths more engaging and interactive. You need to do extensive research on your audience and really zero in on what message you want the attendees to go home with.

Corey Burns discussed the pros and cons of developing a phone application for your organization. Before jumping into the vast app market, consider: How much will it cost to create the app? Is your app new? Innovative? Why would people download your app if you already have a website?

Spark Freedom’s own Nicole Williams provided insight on how to develop a marketing plan for a market that seems to be constantly changing. Your plan should consist of goals that are grounded in change yet can be measured in terms of success. For example: “We want to change the way people are talking about liberty.” Such a goal is implicitly dynamic because it presumes the way people talk about liberty will keep evolving. But you can influence that change in the right direction, and you can create measures to determine that influence.

Listen to the entire April Spark Session to find out:

  • How should a company approach developing an app on a budget? Are apps worth the costs?
  • How do you avoid having a bad looking website on mobile phones?
  • 5 tips from Kevan Kjar on writing a successful story
  • 7 strategies from Sarah Johnson on having an attractive trade show booth

Enjoy!

 

Image credit: xkcd.com