June Spark Session: Crowdfunding – Making It Work

Sounds great: Unleash the power of art and artists to teach liberty and pro-freedom change. Host an all-day celebration of liberty, Arts and Minds in liberal Portland. Invite everyone to come, paint, party, and learn. Involve lots of organizations working to reform the creaky Oregon criminal justice system. Transform an ugly wall into a public […]

May Spark Session: SMS Demystified

Dan Beck, Txtwire founder and CEO, explains the ins and outs of short text messages sent to an audience that already knows your work and has asked to be informed. He defines why and when such texting boosts your communications reach, how to message for best effect, and when to transition from email to short messaging service (SMS).

March Spark Session: Wiki How?

Jonathan Haines and Nicole Williams talk through five considerations as you transition from “I don’t like my Wikipedia page” to becoming a Wiki wonk – because working Wikipedia wrong can land you in world of wasted time!

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February Spark Session: Ask The Experts – Incorporating Media Into Your Messaging

Barb Ford, Sean Malone, and Nicole Williams answer all your questions about incorporating media into your organization’s messaging.

November Spark Session: Improve Your Digital Marketing

Our November Spark Session “Improve Your Digital Marketing” explored meaningful metrics, focusing your message, and tying up loose ends.

Show Notes

Intro 1:20

Most Important Aspects of a Digital Strategy 3:13

Customer Journey 4:58

Web Design Concepts 6:11

What to Communicate for Success 11:25

Organic Synergy 12:50

Meaningful Measurements 15:30

Digital Strategy 17:21

Cohesive Messaging 20:15

What’s Coming Next 22:05

Summary 22:40

Q&A

Digital Marketing Tools 27:02

Becoming the Best 29:43

Marketing Targets 32:11

General vs. Specific 34:35

Resources

www.DiscoverPraxis.com
www.DerekMagill.com

September Spark Session: Telling vs Selling

The September Spark Session, “Telling vs Selling,” explored how to listen intently so you “sell” the right aspect of your product. Be sure to watch the whole recording!

Show notes

Figure out which story to tell (4:50)

Who does your story target? (6:15)

How to sell a cellphone (7:30)

The 3 principles of ALL selling: Ask, Listen, Link (9:30)

Telling or Selling #1: GOP.com vs Democrats.org vs LP.org (11:00)

Telling or Selling #2: Organ donation (14:15)

Sell a complex policy in bite-size chunks (18:05)

Making Fiscal Federalism (somewhat) sexy (18:40)

Why people buy (24:45)

When should you tell? (27:45)

Make numbers memorable – even emotional (30:20)

Selling to policy wonks (32:00)

Q & A:

How can a policy paper sell, not tell? (34:15)

Should my selling points always be positive? (36:35)

What policy area has been the most difficult to sell? (38:55)

What if I just can’t figure out my listener’s desire? (41:10)

When you don’t yet know your audience – say, as you develop a policy – how can you sell? What if you can’t afford market research? (45:00)

Resources

Roger Dooley, Brainfluence

 

Save the date! Our next Spark Session is November 17.

To catch up on past Spark Sessions, visit our Archives.

August Spark Session: Ask the Experts

In our August Spark Session, Scott Graves (LibertyLab), Kevan Kjar (ArrowHead3 Consulting), and Spark Freedom’s own Nicole Williams tackled a whole sombrero full of your questions about marketing and communications. This session is so chock full of information, be sure to watch the whole recording or download the audio for your listening pleasure!

Here’s this session’s roadmap:

What do I do if I can’t find stories to support our marketing or policy message? (2:45)

How do I even get started with our 2017 marketing plan? (5:45)

Recently, our Facebook page views have dropped dramatically. What strategies work now? Should we move to a different platform? (7:35)

How can we persuade people we know are opposed to our policy proposal? (14:20)

How do I tackle objections? (19:15)

What social media platforms should we be on, and how often should we post? (24:50)

What is the appropriate length for a YouTube video for a policy idea/message? (29:50)

We’re thinking of doing a podcast. Do you think podcasts are still a good marketing tool? What tips do you have to make them successful (e.g. length, frequency, content)? (34:00)

Do you think social media is more important than your website? (39:05)

How can you effectively market on a very small/no dollar budget? Do you have good examples of that you can share? (41:05)

Any advice for making videos on a dime? (46:15)

 

Download the audio (right-click > save): Spark Session August 2016 – Audio

 

Our next Spark Session is September 22. Save the date!

To catch up on past Spark Sessions, visit the Archives.

 

 

July Spark Session: The DNA of Story

This month’s Spark Session centered on the DNA of storytelling. Spark Freedom’s Nicole Williams and Kevan Kjar of Arrowhead3 Consulting discussed what it takes to create winning stories that further your policy or organizational message.

Great stories, stories that people are moved by and become invested in, consists of three parts:

  1. Mission: What problem are you trying to solve? What issue is your policy addressing?
  2. Hero: Who are you solving it for? This should be someone with a real story to whom people can relate.
  3. Conflict: What stands in your Hero’s way? What obstacle(s) need to be overcome?

Once you’ve established these three components and crafted your story, how do you get people to listen to it? To capture your audience’s attention, you’ll need a great log line. A log line is a one-sentence summary of what your story is about using the three key elements in your story, i.e. the central conflict, the hero, and the mission. A log line should have an emotional “hook” that stimulates the audience’s interest. Be sure to watch the recording for examples.

Of course, you can’t create compelling stories and log lines that appeal to everybody, so you’ll want to focus on your strongest audience. And, while not all people in your audience are going through what your hero is going through, your log line should elicit a strong sense of empathy from them for your hero. This will get them invested in your message.

Finally, don’t stop with one good story. If one person is facing a certain issue that your policy is trying address, there is a good chance that other people are, too. The more stories you can tell of people dealing with the problem you’re trying to solve, the more compelling your narrative becomes.

Watch the entire Spark Session to learn more, such as:

  • How to appeal to different audiences
  • How to humanize your story
  • How to get people to care about your policy
  • How to write a successful log line (and what a log line is)
  • Examples are also provided for reference!

You can also download the slide deck from the session: The DNA of Story.